Splice + Texas Hippie Coalition

This is Mark Matson for Splice Magazine, on location at Fort Rock talking with Cord Pool and Timmy Braun of Texas Hippie Coalition.

Cord Pool & Timmy Braun of Texas Hippie Collection, with Mark Matson (middle) of Splice Magazine @ Fort Rock, Sunrise, FL 04/29/18

So, how was the festival for you today?

Timmy: I had a great time! It went off great! We even played a new song that anybody that knows our band wouldn’t have heard unless they were at the festival (Welcome to Rockville) yesterday!

So, you guys have been working on new material for a new album?

Yup. To be honest with you, we already planned on having it done. We started writing songs that are better and better. Then we were like ‘hold on, wait a second let’s make these kinds of songs‘. It will probably be out summertime.

So, when you started writing for the new album, did you just get stronger material as you went, or did you change direction?

Both. Cord will write a song, then I’ll write a song, then we’ll all write a song.

Are you going to do a similar album to the last one, go heavier or maybe change direction?

We’ll probably do more southern stuff, heavy southern stuff. We have to stay rockin’!!

Are you going to stick with the red dirt metal?

Ya, ya. We might get better!

What are your plans after Fort Rock?

We have a 7-week tour. Next weekend is Carolina Rebellion. We’ve done that one before; it’s great too! California is on this run. It’s been probably three years since we’ve done that. So, we are hitting some new places and some old places. It’s the first tour of the year. We have a Canadian band with us. It is a four-band package.

You’re going from festivals to clubs. What’s that like with the energy? Going from a big stage to an intimate setting?

To me it’s the rest of your day. On stage is only 30 minutes to an hour. You have to wake up earlier after you were just up late. Then your schedule kind of shifts a little bit from your regular daily routine. Other than that, it’s all great.

You feel that same energy?

Timmy: Yes, it’s just as powerful!

Cord: I think fans are the same way. I know some people that won’t come to stuff like this. They would rather watch you at a smaller club.

Do you do your writing off-season, or do you also write on the road?

Sometimes it’s hard to write on the road.

Do you get any inspiration for your songs from being out on the road?

Timmy: Sure, a little a bit.

Cord: A lot of it is planned out. Rich is kind of a storyteller.

Timmy: And of course, we have songs about whiskey, weed, and women! (laughing) You can do a lot of things with those three things!!!

It’s been great chatting with you guys, thank you for your time and have a great tour!

Thank you!

Texas Hippie Coalition:
     

Be sure to check out Splice’s entire Fort Rock coverage!

 Journalist: Mark Matson

With a Southern rock-influenced brand of metal that incorporates punk, grunge, and pure melodic hard rock into the blender, Texas Hippie Coalition at their best sound like Molly Hatchet and Charlie Daniels crossed with Pantera chasing after the rock ghost of Lynyrd Skynyrd. Their self-described “red dirt metal” is very much a product of gigging out of Chickasha and Denison, Texas, not far from the Oklahoma state line — Red River Valley territory. Formed in 2008, THC consist of Big Dad Ritch, John Exall, Wes Wallace, Timmy Braun, and Randy Cooper. Self-released debut Pride of Texas appeared in 2008, after which THC quickly gained steam, signing with Dallas-based label Carved Records. Rollin’, their Dave Prater-produced follow-up, arrived in 2010, followed two years later by Peacemaker, which rose to number 20 on Billboard’s Hard Rock Albums chart. Working with producers Bob Marlette and Skidd Mills, THC thickened up their already gritty sound on 2014’s Ride On, which marked their first appearance on the Top 200 chart. The red-dirt metal party train continued to chug along with the band’s fifth album, 2016’s Dark Side of Black. – IT

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